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Is there still a good sense of community among the creative sector in Scotland?

Scotland has a great digital and creative reputation. Whether it’s in the form of forward-thinking creative PR strategies, or ground-breaking animation, the Scottish creative sector has a lot to be proud of. But with spending cuts affecting the way agencies operate, how is the changing face of Scotland’s creative sector reflective of the industry as a whole? Is it possible for creative businesses to really thrive in Scotland?

The Drum spoke to successful agencies that are doing just that, to find out their views on Scotland, its potential, and how the country’s creative landscape might just continue to flourish.

The Drum speaks to a cross-section of agencies north of the border to find out their views on Scotland's creative landscape.

Richard Scott, managing director, Axis Animation
This is the one thing I’d like to see change for the better. I think there could be even more vibrancy to the creative sector in Scotland if we just got together more. But it needs to be natural; I am not talking about events instigated by government or enterprise companies. I am talking about people genuinely just wanting to meet other creatives for inspiration and to share.

For animation we have the Scottish Animation Network, which is trying hard to bring some of this community together. There have also been interesting events such as Asylum, an animation brunch event held in Edinburgh and set up by David Bailey from video game developers Rockstar North. I realise that I need to put my money where my mouth is and be part of the swell that will make these things happen, can't just bitch from the sidelines.

Susie Fraser, Owner Incentive Media Ltd
Yes, indeed. We have formed a couple of significant alliances with other agencies, which have proved fruitful on both sides. Working with companies you respect and who have the same ethos and vision is rewarding, both financially and creatively.

Aaron Harper, Creative Director, Weather Digital and Print Communications
Yes, and I've never been aware that there wasn';t a good sense of community. I was one of the founders of LongLunch a few years ago now. A bunch of like-minded creatives from various companies in Edinburgh and Glasgow got together to organise talks, events and share ideas. It was and still is a great success.

Perhaps there wasn't such a strong community before the internet came along. But now we have online forums and open source technologies that allow people from all around the world to share ideas, developments and technologies. This in turn has been mirrored offline where inter-company communications is a lot more open than it previously was.

Ian Ord, business development director, Fifth Ring
There is a sense that there is a close creative community in the central belt but sadly this doesn't exist up here in the North East.

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